nataliemeansnice:

misandry1996:

lnvocation:

[throws drink]

big surprise from the woman who wrote a song about why being fat is good because boys like it. 

literally fuck this

pinkpurplebluepride:

But on a side note queer folks let’s bring on some statistics, okay:

  • Bisexuals are at the bottom of tolerance levels, just above intravenous drug users, according to a survey of 1,334 heteros
  • Bi youth between 14 and 21 are more likely to be suicidal than any other sexually identified group—University of Minnesota
  • One out of three lesbians believed that bisexuality does not exist, giving responses like: “I was born [homosexual]; some are born heterosexual. I find it hard to believe that people can be bisexual.”
  •  Bisexuals have significantly lower incomes than heterosexuals, gays and lesbians. Gay men and lesbians earn between 2 and 3 percent less than heterosexuals, while bisexuals earn between 10 and 15 percent less than heterosexuals
  • Nearly half of all bisexual women are survivors of rape.
  • Bisexuals face greater physical and mental health disparities than lesbians, gays, and the broader population. Bisexuals are also less likely to have access to insurance or financial resources for health care.
imaginasi0n:

blackfemalejesus:

american-radical:

Preach

*falls down fifteen flights of stairs and through a window*

boo ya

imaginasi0n:

blackfemalejesus:

american-radical:

Preach

*falls down fifteen flights of stairs and through a window*

boo ya

thedapperproject:

Scarlett

shrooomieee:

Neither land nor women are territories of conquest

shrooomieee:

Neither land nor women are territories of conquest

warcrimenancydrew:

gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.

The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.

The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.

As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.

My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.

I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.

These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.

Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.

The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.

You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls

ahhhh i’m so conflicted about this bc on the one hand i am sooo happy that this representation finally exists (i myself used to dream abt south asian and muslim dolls as a child in post 9/11 america) but there has to be a better way than with those tragic stories, right? i know at least it’s something, and it’s not inaccurate per se, but does this strike anyone else as yet another western well-meaning way of making girls of color, especially when they’re from other countries, look tragic and constantly oppressed? this is so good, i just wish it were better!

"If its one thing I learned from Amy, is that hiding those feelings is a very, very hard thing to do. Eventually the truth slips out. But if you’re able to hold it in, it might also just start to slowly eat away at you. I think the best thing, in the end, is to communicate those feelings. Yes, there is the risk of losing that person, but I also think if you are prepared for those feelings to not be reciprocated, it will be easier to salvage the relationship. Because then you are prepared for the worst and you can start figuring out how to maintain the friendship after the feelings are out in the open. I think people have the notion sometimes that if they confess their love, maybe that other person will feel the same way. But sadly, that’s not always the case. I think honestly is the best policy in this situation, and also being ready to get your feelings hurt. If you are prepared for that, the only way left after that is up."